Friday, January 3, 2014

From PhilH: 28mm Colonial British Marines & Rocket Section (55 points)


From Phil:
For my next entry, a unit of the Royal Marine Light Infantry to join my British force in the Sudan. The RMLI were one of the first units to disembark at Suakin in 1885 following the Mahdist revolt, With a strength of 464 men and 14 officers, they fought at El Teb and Tamai. Their helmets, pouches and belts were lightened with white pipe-clay, which makes them quite distinctive. 
I thought I'd left the white cross-belts behind with Napoleonics, but it seems a glutton for punishment. These took an age to do, particularly on the kneeling figures. But I'm pleased with the final outcome.
I've included a couple of pics of them defending a zariba, joined by the bugler and sergeant that I finished an age ago. Seven minis were painted during the Challenge, all from the Perry range. 

They are joined by some more fire support: a British Hales rocket team. I haven't actually found reference to the British using rockets in Sudan, though I've seen a few references to Egyptian forces doing so. But I couldn't resist adding one to my force: I find the British perseverance with the rocket as a weapon of war quite charming and Hales rockets remained in service until well after the Mahdist revolt was brought to heel. 

This is a very fine Empress miniatures sculpt from their Anglo-Zulu war range. The rocket trough is quite delicate and I did accidentally crush it, to repair it I had to prop it up with a small rock!
Lovely work Phil. Those Marines look the treat especially in that shot of them amongst your new zariba scrub, and that rocket team seems ready to make a nuisance of themselves with their infernal contraption.

These British troops of the Sudan will give Phil 55 points. A nice points-add for your Victorian Duel as well, Phil and nary a gypsy in sight!  ;P

25 comments:

  1. Stunning! Your choice of colours seems to be spot on.

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    1. Thanks! That aspect I always seem to struggle with, so my uniformed troops tend to come out much better than irregular types - I do envy people who can put together a good rabble/horde in appropriate tones without getting the clown-effect!

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  2. Well more colonial stuff it's always a good idea. Need to keep the natives under control and all that. How else will we maintain the empire. Nice work they look great.

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    1. Thankee Tamsin for your kind words.

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  4. Lovely, lovely work Phil and I especially like the improvised rock - something I am sure would have happened in real life too! As for the gypsies Mr. Campbell, pah! So last year, I've moved on to Victorian era Mexicans now!

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    1. Thanks Michael, that means a lot from you. Now where are your Mahdist offerings? Or are they hidden behind the quite essential miniatures for Queen Victoria's famous war with the Msxicans?

      Have you no shame, man? ;-)

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  5. Fantastic painting work, sir. Very nice units.

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    1. Thanks Juan. I'd love to see your take on the same subject.

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  6. Phil, those are just amazing. Great job.

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  7. Very crisp painting, wish I was a few steps behind you on the skills table

    Ian

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    1. Perhaps, but many steps ahead on the speed table, which it a skill unto itself!

      While I'm long-practiced at 28mm, there is no way I could do 6mm in the quality or quantity you do, a talent that I do envy.

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  8. great looking marines and a rocket crew always close to my heart

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    1. Very cool aren't they. Can't wait to put if onto the table to 'scare off' the natives.

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  9. Gorgeous Perry scuplts and wonderfully painted. I've got these too and love them. Hopefully yours do as well as mine on the table top!

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  10. Absolutely beautiful - makes me want to get some figs for this period.

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