Thursday, March 6, 2014

From MilesR: 28mm ACW Confederate Infantry - Hampton's Legion (121 points)


From Miles:

I’m very happy to submit the 5th and final regiment of Hood’s Brigade (circa 1862): Hampton’s Legion from South Carolina. As with all my ACW Confederates, these are the 28mm Perry Plastics. Outside of some ironclad crewman and Confederate marines (Redoubt figures) all of my ACW collection are either Perry metals or plastics.

This regiment has a very unique history as it was formed and financed by the leading land owner in South Carolina, Wade Hampton and was the only regiment in the Confederate army to boast integrate cavalry and artillery companies along with the infantry - hence the “Legion” designation. In practice, while on campaign the integrated cavalry and artillery units were parceled out to more traditional commands. 
The unit was attached to Hood’s “Texas” Brigade in 1862 and fourth with distinction during all the major engagements in the east during 1862. The regiment took horrific causalities at Antietam and went into reserve until reactivated to join Lee’s Gettysburg campaign where it arrived in time to cover the retreat.
Wade Hampton was a very interesting character. Not only did he personally raise and fund the unit during the war, he also became a leader of the opposition to the radical republicans reconstruction. Unfortunately, Hampton lead a political movement in South Carolina known as the “Red Shirts” which advocated violence to influence elections. Today we would refer to the Red Shirts as a para-military group. Despite his unsavory affiliations, Hampton was elected governor of post-war South Carolina twice and to the US senate after that. Perhaps the only redeeming aspect of Hampton’s post war political career is that he ran his campaigns from an infamous brothel in Columbia, SC called the “Big Brick House” - his stated reasoning was to assure “privacy”. I think it somewhat fitting for a politician to be based out of brothel.
Next are a few photo’s of the completed brigade, including General Hood himself. During this year’s challenge 4 of the 5 infantry regiments were painted along with the 2 guns and crews. The brigade consists of in the front row, from left to right, Hampton’s artillery battery, the 1st Texas (completed during last years Challenge) and general Hood. The second row features the 4th Texas and 18th Georgia regiments. The back row has the 5th Texas and, finally, Hampton’s Legion.

I’ve really enjoyed building out the brigade. It’s one of three full brigades I’ve completed for my Confederate army, with the other two being the Stonewall brigade (everyone has that one) and a generic brigade that has more of a Western theater feel to it.
The command of Hood’s brigade at my upcoming game at Historicon this year will be reserved for any Challenge participants that make their way to the con. Of course, if you prefer the side of the Union, there’s always the Iron Brigade or even the Irish brigade awaiting your orders!

Wow, what a great accomplishment Miles!  I've heard of Hampton's Legion but I was not aware of his chequered past - a great unit to finish off with. Also, I'm really delighted to see the whole brigade all arrayed and ready for action. Very, very impressive.

Hampton's Legion, his final unit to this project, will give Miles 121 points which is enough for him to exceed his Challenge points target. Well done and congratulations Miles!

Okay, a few posts ago I had given warning that once Miles had completed this segment of his ACW project I would submit something to mark the occasion and make you all laugh. So, to keep that promise and in recognition of Miles' dual achievements below is a picture of me from many, many moons ago when I worked in Biloxi Mississippi at the Beauvoir Museum (it was taken for a newspaper article and my boss, the head curator at that time, is seen loading his musket next to me). While I was down there I re-enacted with a wonderful group of folks from the 3rd Miss. and managed to take in many, many ACW events in the South. As you can see I was rather hirsute back then (I remember taping a couple mock arrows to my chest and going as Custer during Halloween that year). My wife laughs looking at this photo as she has borne witness to the inexorable 'deforestation' of my locks and tresses. Nonetheless, those were very good times and I grin whenever I see this picture.


Yeah, laugh it up people...


24 comments:

  1. Lovely work Miles..
    Great to see the em all together.

    Curt your such a hippy...

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  2. Very nice Miles. Great to see them all together.

    I had photos like that of me.... but I burnt them! (Dark age re-enactment)

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  3. Curt - it looks to me like you've mistakingly switched out a promo photo from the original "Dukes of Hazard" TV series - that picture looks like Beau and Luke Duke!

    Biloxi! We were practically neighbors - I grew up in Bayou La Batre Alabama which was just over the state line.

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    1. Ha! I drove through your town many a time to get to Fort Gaines on Dauphin Island. I had many friends from those parts. Lovely country around there (and a great southern accent - especially amongst the ladies).

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  4. Very cool mate, and your wavy locks were wonderful...lol

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  5. Curt
    Johnny we hardly knew ye! You had not only long hair but it was curly and tending to blonde. However, the mischievous smirk has not changed much. I agree with the Dukes of hazard comment.
    Cheers
    PD

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  6. Fabulous entry and my don't you look dashing!

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  7. That is an impressive work Miles and good to see them photographed on the gaming table as is right and proper. Best wishes at Historicon with them!

    Curt, don't listen to these silly men, they're jealous of that hair. I know what the women of that period liked. I don't imagine you had too much trouble getting more than a few of them back to your place after a party :)

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    1. Cripes, I'm jealous of that hair! :P It was of an era to be sure, but it did serve its purpose.

      Yes, it was a good time to be single. :)

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  8. Marvellous work Miles. I'll bet your glad to have this project finished.

    Just one question - where are the Legion's integral cavalry and artillery?

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    1. The artillery's on the left. The Legions cab was parceled out to Jeb Stuart and never actually maneuvered with the infantry while on campaign

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  9. Very nice work!!!

    Curt, you were a hippy rebel!

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  10. Your finished army is an absolutely impressing sight. Well done.

    And no... I won't make a comment about Mr. Hippy Curt... maybe later... had a good laugh though.

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  11. Great work Miles. The brigade looks superb arrayed for battle on that hill.

    Curt, it's good to see I'm not the only one around here with a long haired, checkered past as a re-enactor...

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    1. Chequered past is right If they had drug tests for re-enacting back then I'd never made it on the field for any of the events. ;)

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  12. I think I need to repaint a figure to look like Curt. Of course I'll need some green staff to add his dashing "Lady Killer" locks - maybe when I do Barksdale's MS Brigade

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    1. Barksdale's Brigade would be very cool. I love that painting by Don Troiani of Barksdale's charge at Gettysburg. The 17th Miss was part of that brigade and had several Canadians in its ranks who were ex-Red River river-boatmen. That was my 'home' unit when I was heavy into re-enacting.

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  13. Great work Miles , they do look the biz!!!
    And just look at that long wavy hair...he he!

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  14. "Deforestation" is a very serious issue for our time...

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  15. That's a great looking Brigade Miles

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  16. Thats a proper brigade Miles, wonderful !

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