Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Entry #6 to the AHPC - 28mm Italian Wars Bolognese Crossbowmen


I've been suffering through a terrible headcold these past few days but I did manage to get these boys off the table.

This is a unit of crossbowmen from the Italian city of Bologna ca 1500. We see them here, shooting from behind their pavise shields, while under fire from some opposing missile troops.


I chose Bologna for a couple reasons. The first is pure laziness: Bologna's heraldic crest, a red cross on white background, is relatively easy to do freehand. 

A depiction of fighting between militia factions in Bologna, from the Croniche of Giovanni Sercambi of Lucca.

I also I appreciate Bolognese civil politics of the time. It seems that Bologna was the only Renaissance Italian city (and probably one of the few in Europe) who allowed women to excel in any chosen profession, even permitting them to attend the city's university. Also, Bologna was a center of the arts in its own right, with a residence of painters that rivaled that of Rome and Florence during the period. (BTW, In 1506 it was invaded and sacked by Papal armies, its art was stolen and its progressive civil liberties squashed  (yet another tick-mark in the scorecard of enlightened organized religion...).)


...and finally, let's not forget that a good Bolognese sauce is in of itself worthy to fight for...


These ten 28mm metal figures are from the Perry's 'European Wars' range while the pavises (pavisii?) are from their European Mercenaries box set. 


For the stricken crossbowman I used a plastic Perry Napoleonic British casualty figure, shaved off the offending detail, gave him a breastplate (roughly) made with a bit of green-stuff and then added a sallet helmet and crossbow. The city pennon is a repaint of one of the cutouts provided in the Perry box sets.

I often hot-glue a stump, boulder etc. at the back of my large bases to give players something to grip on to when moving them on the tabletop.


The irregularly shaped MDF base was a sample sent along to me from Simon Miller (aka BigRedBat). He's developed these for use for his 'To The Strongest' ruleset. (Thanks very much Simon!)  For the past year or so I've been thinking of creating basing like this and so I was really stoked when I saw Simon's bases on his website. I really like the organic shape of these bases and am planning to do-up my upcoming Italian Wars collection using these in various dimensions. 


37 comments:

  1. That Sir, was a thing of beauty! The miniatures alone are gorgeous, but the detailing and the base take it to another level. Certainly in my little black book under the title 'challenge favourites'!

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    1. That is high praise indeed, thank you Michael, I'm delighted you like it.

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    1. Thanks Brendan, this was inspired by your late medieval efforts so thanks again.

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  3. Wonderful work - a museum piece.

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  4. Excellent work! Who wouldn't fight for a good Spagbol!

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    1. Indeed! A good fettuccine is surely worth a couple of volleys. :)

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    1. Thanks Chris, this is high praise coming from you as I'm a great admirer of your stunning 15mm work in this period.

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  6. Really enjoyed this entry! Great topic and equally great painting Curt!

    Christopher

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    1. Cheers Christopher - I look forward to when you finally succumb to this period. :)

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  7. great job on the figures but the bases are great. what a brilliant idea.

    John

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    1. Yes, I really like the irregular bases. You'll be seeing more of these in the coming months.

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    2. I just ordered a dozen of the terrain bases as a bases for my bamboo jungle for my Guadalcanal CoC campaign.

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    3. Yes, I think they will be awesome as terrain bases. Very cool.

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  8. They look great, look forward to an army of these chaps, basing looks very good too
    Best Iain

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    1. Thanks Iain! Believe me, nobody more than me is looking forward to an army of these boys.

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  9. Awesome work :)
    The basing is a unique idea... I like the edgy bits!

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    1. Thanks Mike - I like the edgy bits too. ;)

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  10. a really beautiful work and a lot of envy...only 2 things to say.they look a little more older than 1500,maybe between 1450 and 1470...second i think in the pic of the bolognese sauce are spaghetti.the real name is RAGU'and isnt used with spaghetti,but with tagliatelle. Sorry but the spaghetti with bolognese sauce are a fairy tale for turists.a question: where you have found the flag?
    excuse me for the mail and for my english.... :(
    Alberto Pagnotti a real Bolognese born under the 2 Towers,litteraly,if you know them

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    1. Thanks very for your comment Alberto! In regards to the date, that is why I said 'ca 1500' as 'ca' in English is an abbreviation of 'approximately' (and allows me to be sloppy in my dates):)

      The bolognese sauce may be a fairy tale for tourists, but is a fairy tale I'm more than willing to believe in. When I am in Bologna next I will look you up and you can show me some authentic local pasta. :)

      The flag I painted myself getting inspiration from the art card from the Perry Miniatures 'Mercenaries' boxed set.

      Thanks again Alberto.

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  11. i shall be very happy to meet you!!!! you have been here before????
    Alberto

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    1. Not for a long time. I lived in Milan for awhile when I was a young man - it was a very good time. :)

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  12. Amazing! I need to step up my basing!

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